Department of English

Modern English Linguistics

Prof. Dr. David Britain

Full Professor and Chair of English Linguistics, Director, Department of English

Modern English Linguistics

Phone
+41 31 631 83 81
E-Mail
britain@ens.unibe.ch
Office
B 265
Postal Address
Department of English
Unitobler
Länggassstr. 49
CH – 3000 Bern 9
Consultation Hour
Spring Semester 2017:
Feb 23 11-12
Feb 28 9-10
Mar 6 13-14
Mar 14 16-17
Mar 22 9-10
Mar 27 13-14
Apr 27 11-12
May 10 4-5
May 18 4.30-5.30
May 22 15-16
May 31 17.30-18.30

David Britain studied Linguistics, French and German at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England (1983-87), before beginning a UK Economic and Social Research Council-sponsored PhD in sociolinguistics at the University of Essex in Colchester, England for which he investigated the linguistic consequences of dialect contact in the reclaimed Fenland of East Anglia. In 1991 he began a two-year Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Linguistics (now School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies) of Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. There he was part of a research team (along with Prof. Janet Holmes, Prof. Allan Bell and Dr. Mary Boyce) undertaking the first large-scale social dialect analysis of New Zealand English. He returned to the University of Essex as a Lecturer in 1993, but retained his links with the Southern Hemisphere, as a British Academy-sponsored Visiting Scholar at Victoria University in 1996 and again in 1998, this time sponsored by the British Council, and as a visiting Scholar at the University of Sydney in 2000. In 2002 he became Senior Lecturer at Essex. Since January 2010 he holds the Chair of Modern English Linguistics here at the University of Bern. Dave is Associate Editor of the Journal of Sociolinguistics, co-author of Linguistics: an introduction (Cambridge University Press, second edition, 2009) (with Andrew Radford, Martin Atkinson, Harald Clahsen and Andrew Spencer), editor of Language in the British Isles (Cambridge University Press, 2007) and co-editor (with Jenny Cheshire) of Social Dialectology (Benjamins, 2003). He has co-edited a special issue of the International Journal of the Sociology of Language on dialect death in Europe with Dr Reinhild Vandekerckhove (Universiteit Antwerpen in Belgium) and Dr Willy Jongenburger (Meertens Institut, Amsterdam, the Netherlands), published in 2009. He has been an invited speaker in France, Spain, Belgium, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Australia, Malaysia and the US, as well as New Zealand, the UK and Switzerland.

You can find more information about Prof Britain's research on his personal website: http://davebritain.weebly.com.

Doctoral Supervision

Dominique BÜRKI: Saipanese English: History, development and structure of an emergent Micronesian variety

Anna GALLO: The intergenerational linguistic assimilation of Anglo-Italians: a comparative analysis

Hannah HEDEGARD: English in the Cocos Keeling Islands: History, structure and development

Tobias LEONHARDT: Kiribati English: History, development and structure of an emergent Micronesian variety

Sara LYNCH: Kosraean English: History, development and structure of an emergent Micronesian variety

Elisa MARENZI: Becoming Australian: Italian and Lebanese Englishes in Melbourne

Christoph NEUENSCHWANDER: Contact, Mobility and Authenticity: Language Ideologies in Creolisation

Christa SCHNEIDER: Gvätterlisch oder spiusch? Sprachwandel im Berner Mittelland seit den Erhebungen zum Sprachatlas der deutschen Schweiz

Anja THIEL:Phonological change and social meaning in Ogdensburg, New York State

Phillip TIPTON: The psycholinguistics of sociophonological variation and change in St Helens English

Laura TRESCH: Language ideologies in new dialect formation: the legitimisation of New Zealand and 'Estuary' Englishes

Franziska WAHL: Variation and change in the future tense in Southern England

Recent Courses

Autumn 2016

Foundations of Sociolinguistics

The Past in Spoken Englishes

Spring 2016

Dialect at Work

Dialects in Contact, Dialects in Isolation

[with Christa Schneider] I’m like, it’s all about the local dialect and that/U när i so, es geit ume Dialäkt hie u so: quotatives and general extenders in Bernese Swiss German.

Autumn 2015

East Anglian English

Foundations of Sociolinguistics

Spring 2015

Analysing English Accents

Doing dialectology: fieldwork excursion to Norwich

Autumn 2014

Foundations of Sociolinguistics

Methods in Dialectology

Spring 2014

“Language and Woman’s Place”: 40 Years of Sociolinguistic Research on Language and Gender

Pacific Englishes

Autumn 2013

Foundations of Language Variation and Change

Analysing Grammatical Variation and Change: Relative Clauses and Verbs of Possession

In Press

2016

Dialect contact and new dialect formation. In Dominic Watt, John Nerbonne and Charles Boberg (eds.), Handbook of Dialectology. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell.

Which way to look?: Perspectives on “Urban” and “Rural” in dialectology. In Emma Moore and Chris Montgomery (eds.) A Sense of Place: Studies in Language and Region. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Language, mobility and scale in South and Central Asia: a commentary. International Journal of the Sociology of Language.

 

[with Keiko Hirano] Accommodation, dialect contact and grammatical variation: Verbs of obligation in the Anglophone community in Japan. In Olga Timofeeva, Anne Gardner and Alpo Honkapohja (eds.), Building Bridges: Methodology, Corpora, and Globality in English Linguistics. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

 

Sedentarism, nomadism and the sociolinguistics of dialect. In Nikolas Coupland (ed.), Sociolinguistics: Theoretical Debates. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 217-241.

[with Allan Bell and Devyani Sharma] (eds.) Labov and Sociolinguistics: Fifty Years of Language in Social Context. Special issue of Journal of Sociolinguistics Volume 20 (4). Oxford: Wiley.

[with Allan Bell and Devyani Sharma] Labov in Sociolinguistics: an introduction. Journal of Sociolinguistics 20: 399-408.

[with Allan Bell, Bonnie McIlhenny, Joseph Park and Devyani Sharma] How to get published in the Journal of Sociolinguistics. Journal of Sociolinguistics 20: 3-5.

[with Adrian Leemann, Marie-José Kolly, Ross Purves and Elvira Glaser] Crowdsourcing language change with smartphone applications. PlosOne 11 (1): e0143060. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0143060

[with Adrian Leemann, Marie-José Kolly]. English Dialects: an English dialect application for the smartphone.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/english-dialects/id882340404?l=de&mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D8

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ch.uk_regional

[with Siria Guzzo] (eds.) Languaging Diversity: Volume 2: Sociolinguistics and Identity. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars.

[with Siria Guzzo] Languaging Identities: an Introduction. In Siria Guzzo and David Britain (eds.), Languaging Diversity: Volume 2: Sociolinguistics and Identity. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars.

2015

Between North and South: The Fenland. In Raymond Hickey (ed.). Researching Northern English. Amsterdam: Benjamins. 417-435.

[with Kazuko Matsumoto] Palauan English. In Jeff Williams, Edgar Schneider, Peter Trudgill and Daniel Schreier (eds.). Further Studies in the Lesser Known Varieties of English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 305-343.

[with Adrian Leemann, Marie-José Kolly, Ross Purves and Elvira Glaser] Documenting sound change with smartphone apps. Journal of the Acoustic Society of America 137 (4): 2304.

2014

[with Adrian Leemann, Marie-José Kolly, Iwar Werlen and Dieter Studer-Joho] The diffusion of /l/-vocalization in Swiss German. Language Variation and Change 26: 191-218.

Where North meets South?: contact, divergence, and the routinisation of the Fenland dialect boundary. In Dominic Watt and Carmen Llamas (eds.), Languages, borders and identity. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 27-43.

2013

Space, diffusion and mobility. In Jack Chambers and Natalie Schilling (eds.), Handbook of Language Variation and Change (second edition). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. 471-500.

The role of mundane mobility and contact in dialect death and dialect birth. In D Schreier and M Hundt (eds.), English as a contact language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 165-181.

Geographical dialectology. In Janet Holmes and Kirk Hazen (eds.), Research Methods in Sociolinguistics. Oxford: Wiley. 246-261.

[with Andrea Sudbury] Falkland Island English. In Bernd Kortmann and Kerstin Lunkenheimer (eds.) The Mouton World Atlas of Variation in English. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 669-676.

2012

Innovation diffusion in sociohistorical linguistics. In J. M. Hernandez Campoy and J. C. Conde Silvestre (eds.), Handbook of Historical Sociolinguistics. Oxford: Blackwell. 451-464.

Diffusion. In A Bergs and L Brinton (eds.), English Historical Linguistics: An International Handbook. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 2031-2043.

Koineization and cake baking: Reflections on methods in dialect contact research. In Andrea Ender, Adrian Leemann and Bernhard Wälchli (eds.), Methods in Contemporary Linguistics. Berlin: de Gruyter Mouton. 219-238.

Countering the urbanist agenda in variationist sociolinguistics: dialect contact, demographic change and the rural-urban dichotomy. In Hansen, Sandra, Christian Schwarz, Philipp Stoeckle and Tobias Streck (eds.), Dialectological and folk dialectological concepts of space. Berlin: de Gruyter. 12-30.

English in England. In Raymond Hickey (ed.), Areal features of the Anglophone World. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 23-52.

[with Kazuko Matsumoto] Palauan English as a newly emerging postcolonial variety in the Pacific. Language, Information, Text 19: 137-167.

[with Annette Kern-Stähler] (eds.).English on the Move : Mobilities in Literature and Language. Tübingen: Narr.

[with Annette Kern-Stähler] Introduction. In Annette Kern-Stähler and David Britain (eds.).English on the Move : Mobilities in Literature and Language. Tübingen: Narr. 11-15.

2011

2010

[with Allan Bell, Monica Heller and Lionel Wee] How to get published in the Journal of Sociolinguistics. Journal of Sociolinguistics 15: 3-5.

The heterogenous homogenisation of dialects in England. Taal en Tongval 63: 43-60.

Conceptualisations of geographic space in linguistics. In Alfred Lameli, Roland Kehrein and Stefan Rabanus (eds.),Language and Space: An International Handbook of Linguistic Variation. Volume 2: Language Mapping. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. 69-97.

Dialectology. In K Malmkjaer (ed.), Encyclopaedia of Linguistics. London: Routledge. 127-133.

[with Andrea Sudbury] South Atlantic Ocean: Falkland Island English. In Daniel Schreier, Peter Trudgill, Edgar Schneider and Jeffrey Williams (eds). Lesser Known Englishes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 209-223.

Supralocal Regional Dialect Levelling. In C Llamas and D Watt (eds.) Language and identities. Edinburgh University Press. 193-204.

Contact and dialectology. In R Hickey (ed.). Handbook of Language Contact. Oxford: Blackwell. 208-229.

Grammatical variation in the contemporary spoken English of England. In Andy Kirkpatrick (ed.), The Handbook of World Englishes. London: Routledge. 37-58.

Dialect contact, focusing and phonological rule complexity: the koineisation of Fenland English. In Miriam Meyerhoff and Erik Schleef (eds.), The Sociolinguistics Reader. London: Routledge. 231-247.

Foreword. In Barry Heselwood and Clive Upton (eds.), Methods in Dialectology: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang. xi.

2009

[with Andrew Radford, Martin Atkinson, Harald Clahsen and Andrew Spencer] Linguistics: An Introduction. (Revised Second Edition) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Language and space: the variationist approach. In P. Auer and J. Schmidt (eds.), Language and space: an international handbook of linguistic variation. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 142-162.

[with Susan Fox] The Regularisation of the Hiatus Resolution System in British English: A Contact-Induced ‘Vernacular Universal’? In Markku Filppula, Juhani Klemola and Heli Paulasto (eds.) Vernacular Universals and Language Contacts: Evidence from Varieties of English and Beyond. London: Routledge. 177-205.

[with Reinhild Vandekerckhove and Willy Jongenburger] (eds.). Dialect Death in Europe? Special double issue of International Journal of the Sociology of Language, Volume 196-197.

One foot in the grave?: Dialect death, dialect contact and dialect birth in England. In David Britain, Reinhild Vandekerckhove and Willy Jongenburger, (eds.), Dialect Death in Europe? Special Issue of International Journal of the Sociology of Language 196/197: 121-155.

[with Reinhild Vandekerckhove] Dialects in western Europe: a balanced picture of language death, innovation and change. In David Britain, Reinhild Vandekerckhove and Willy Jongenburger, (eds.), Dialect Death in Europe? Special Issue of International Journal of the Sociology of Language 196/197: 1-6.

‘Big bright lights’ versus ‘green and pleasant land’? The unhelpful dichotomy of ‘urban’ v ‘rural’ in dialectology. In E Al-Wer and R de Jong (eds.) Arabic dialectology. Leiden: Brill. 223-248.

2008

When is a change not a change?: a case study on the dialect origins of New Zealand English. Language Variation and Change 20: 187-223.

[with Andrea Sudbury] What can the Falkland Islands tell us about Diphthong Shift? Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 57 (1): 1-32.

 

On the wrong track? A non-standard history of non-standard /au/ in English. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 57 (1): 33-77.

 

The importance of 'elsewhere': Looking beyond London and Ireland in the creation of Australian English. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 57 (1): 79-114.

[with Sue Fox] “Vernacular universals” and the regularisation of the hiatus resolution system in British English. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 57 (3): 1-42.

Innovation diffusion, ‘Estuary English’ and local dialect differentiation:

the survival of Fenland Englishes. In Nikolaus Coupland and Adam Jaworski (eds.), Sociolinguistics: Critical Concepts in Linguistics: Volume 1. London: Routledge. 192-217.

2007

(Ed.) Language in the British Isles. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Introduction. In D Britain (ed.) Language in the British Isles. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1-6.

Grammatical variation in England. In D Britain (ed.) Language in the British Isles. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 75-104.

[with Wyn Johnson] L-vocalisation as a Natural Phenomenon:

Explorations in Sociophonology. Language Sciences 29: 294-315.

[with Claudia Felser] Deconstructing what with absolutes. In A Radford (ed.) Martin Atkinson – the Minimalist Muse: Special issue of Essex Research Reports in Linguistics. 53: 97-134.

Review of “Edgar Schneider, Kate Burridge, Bernd Kortmann, Rajend Mesthrie and Clive Upton (eds.) (2004). A Handbook of Varieties of English: Volume 1: Phonology; Volume 2: Morphosyntax; CD-ROM. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter”. Journal of Linguistics 43 (3): 742-746.

Review of “Daniel Schreier (2005). Consonant change in English Worldwide. Basingstoke: Palgrave”. English World-Wide 28 (3): 332-339.

2006

Language/Dialect Contact. In Keith Brown (ed.) Encyclopaedia of Language and Linguistics (second edition): Volume 6. Oxford: Elsevier. 651-656.

[with Kazuko Matsumoto] Palau: Language Situation. In Keith Brown (ed.) Encyclopaedia of Language and Linguistics (second edition): Volume 9. Oxford: Elsevier. 129-130.

2005

Innovation diffusion, ‘Estuary English’ and local dialect differentiation:

the survival of Fenland Englishes. Linguistics 43 (5): 995-1022.

[with Kazuko Matsumoto] Language, Communities, Networks and Practices. In Martin Ball (ed.) Clinical Sociolinguistics. Oxford: Blackwell. 3-14.

[with Peter Trudgill] New dialect formation and contact-induced reallocation: three case studies from the Fens. International Journal of English Studies 5 (1): 183-209.

Where did New Zealand English come from? In Allan Bell, Ray Harlow and Donna Starks (eds.) The Languages of New Zealand. Wellington: Victoria University Press. 156-193.

The Dying Dialects of England? In Antonio Bertacca (ed.) Historical linguistic studies of spoken English. Pisa: Edizioni Plus. 35-46.

2004

Geolinguistics – Diffusion of Language. In Ulrich Ammon, Norbert Dittmar, Klaus Mattheier and Peter Trudgill (eds.) Sociolinguistics: International Handbook of the Science of Language and Society, Berlin: Mouton De Gruyter. 34-48.

Dialect and Accent. In Ulrich Ammon, Norbert Dittmar, Klaus Mattheier and Peter Trudgill (eds.) Sociolinguistics: International Handbook of the Science of Language and Society, Berlin: Mouton De Gruyter. 267-273.

2003

(ed.) [with Jenny Cheshire] Social Dialectology: in honour of Peter Trudgill. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

[with Jenny Cheshire] Introduction. In David Britain and Jenny Cheshire (eds.) Social Dialectology. Amsterdam: Benjamins. 1-8.

Exploring the importance of the outlier in sociolinguistic dialectology. In David Britain and Jenny Cheshire (eds.) Social Dialectology. Amsterdam: Benjamins. 191-208.

[with Kazuko Matsumoto] Language choice and cultural hegemony in the Western Pacific: Linguistic symbols of domination and resistance in the Republic of Palau. In Daniel Nelson and Mirjana Dedaic (eds.) At war with words. Berlin: Mouton. 315-358.

[with Kazuko Matsumoto] The sociolinguistic ‘gender paradox’: a case study from a small multilingual island in the Pacific’ International Journal of Bilingualism. 7: 127-152.

[with Wyn Johnson] L Vocalisation as a naturally occurring phenomenon. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 44: 1-37

[with Kazuko Matsumoto] Contact and obsolescence in a diaspora variety of Japanese: The case of Palau in Micronesia. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 44: 38-75.

2002

Diffusion, levelling, simplification and reallocation in past tense BE in the

English Fens. Journal of sociolinguistics 6 (1): 16-43.

Space and spatial diffusion. In Jack Chambers, Peter Trudgill and Natalie Schilling-Estes (eds.) The Handbook of Variation and Change. Oxford:

Blackwell. 603-637.

[with Andrea Sudbury] There's sheep and there's penguins: 'Drift', ‘slant’ and singular verb forms following existentials in New Zealand and Falkland Island English. In Mari Jones and Edith Esch (eds.) Language Change: The Interplay of Internal, External and Extra-linguistic Factors. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 209-242.

The British history of New Zealand English? Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 41: 1-41.

Phoenix from the ashes?: The death, contact and birth of dialects in England. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 41: 42-73.

Surviving 'Estuary English': innovation diffusion, koineisation and local dialect differentiation in the English Fenland. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 41: 74-103

Dialectology. In David Bickerton (ed.), A Web Guide to Teaching and Learning in Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies. Southampton: Subject Centre for Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies. http://www.llas.ac.uk/resources/gpg/964

[Updated January 2005].

Sociolinguistic Variation. In David Bickerton (ed.), A Web Guide to Teaching and Learning in Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies. Southampton: Subject Centre for Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies. http://www.llas.ac.uk/resources/gpg/1054

[Updated January 2005]

2001

Where did it all start?: dialect contact, the ‘Founder Principle’ and the so-called (-own) split in New Zealand English. Transactions of the Philological Society.99: 1-27.

Welcome to East Anglia!: two major dialect ‘boundaries’ in the Fens. In Peter Trudgill and Jacek Fisiak (eds.) East Anglian English. Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer. 217-242.

Review of Paul Foulkes and Gerard Docherty (eds.) (1999) Urban Voices. London: Arnold. English World-wide 22 (1): 121-128.

Dialect contact and past BE in the English Fens Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 38: 1-38

If A changes to B, make sure A exists: a case study on the dialect origins of New Zealand English. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 38 : 39-79.

[with Kazuko Matsumoto] Conservative and innovative behaviour by female speakers in a multilingual Micronesian society. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 38: 80-106.

2000

[with Andrew Radford, Martin Atkinson, Harald Clahsen and Andrew Spencer] Introduccion a la linguistica. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

[with Peter Trudgill] Migration, dialect contact, new dialect formation and reallocation. In Klaus Mattheier (ed.) Dialect and migration in a changing Europe. Franfurt: Peter Lang. 73-78.

[with Andrea Sudbury] There's sheep and there's penguins: 'Drift' and the use of singular verb forms of BE in plural existential clauses in New Zealand and Falkland Island English. Essex research reports in linguistics. 28: 1-32

[with Andrea Sudbury] Is Falkland Island English linguistically a southern hemisphere variety?. Essex research reports in linguistics. 28: 33-59.

The difference that space makes: an evaluation of the application of human geographic thought in sociolinguistic dialectology. Essex research reports in linguistics. 29: 38-82.

[with Kazuko Matsumoto] Hegemonic diglossia and pickled radish: symbolic domination and resistance in the trilingual Republic of Palau. Essex research reports in linguistics. 29: 1-37.

1999

[with Andrew Radford, Martin Atkinson, Harald Clahsen and Andrew Spencer] Linguistics: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

As far as analysing grammatical variation and change in New Zealand English with relatively few tokens <is concerned/¯>. In Allan Bell and Koenraad Kuiper (eds.) Focus on New Zealand English. Amsterdam: Benjamins. 198-220

[with Paul Warren] Prosody in New Zealand English. In Allan Bell and Koenraad Kuiper (eds.) Focus on New Zealand English. Amsterdam: Benjamins. 146-172.

Locating the baseline of linguistic innovations: dialect contact, the Founder Principle and the so-called (-own) split in New Zealand English In J C Conde Silvestre and J M Hernandez Campoy (eds.) Variation and Linguistic Change in English: Diachronic and Synchronic Studies. Special Issue of Cuadernos de Filologia Inglesa (vol. 8). 177-192.

[with Peter Trudgill] Migration, new-dialect formation and sociolinguistic refunctionalisation: reallocation as an outcome of dialect contact. Transactions of the Philological Society 97: 2 245-256.

Review of Marie Louise Moreau (ed.). (1997). Sociolinguistique: concepts de base. Hayen: Mardaga. Journal of Sociolinguistics 3-4: 584.

1998

Linguistic Change in Intonation: the use of High Rising Terminals in New Zealand English. In P Trudgill and J Cheshire (eds.) The Sociolinguistics Reader: Volume 1: Multilingualism and Variation. London: Arnold. pp213-239.

Review of Donn Bayard (1995) Kiwitalk: Sociolinguistics and New Zealand Society. Palmerston North: Dunmore Press. In The Journal of the Polynesian Society 107 (1): 79-80.

A little goes a long way, as far as analysing grammatical variation and change in New Zealand English <is concerned/Ø>. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 21: 1-32.

High Rising Terminals in New Zealand English: Who uses them, when and why? Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 21: 33-58.

[with Janet Holmes] (1998) Sex, Sound Symbolism and Sociolinguistics: a reply to Gordon and Heath. Current Anthropology 39 (4) 442.

1997

Dialect Contact and Phonological Reallocation: 'Canadian Raising' in the English Fens. Language in Society 26: 15-46.

Dialect Contact, focusing and phonological rule complexity: the koineisation of Fenland English. In C Boberg, M Meyerhoff and S Strassel (eds.) A Selection of Papers from NWAVE 25. Special issue of University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics. 4 (1): 141-170.

Review of C Upton and J Widdowson (1996) An Atlas of English Dialects. Oxford: Oxford University Press. The Times Higher Education Supplement. May 2nd 1997.

(ongoing) [with Jack Chambers] Accents and Dialects. In A Zwicky and R Hudson (eds) Contemporary English. Volume 105 of Annotated Bibliography for English Studies. Lisse, Netherlands: Swets and Zeitlinger.

1995

Review of Suzanne Romaine (1994) Language in Society: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. S ociolinguistica 9: 147-149.

Review of Donn Bayard (1995) Kiwitalk: Sociolinguistics and New Zealand Society. Palmerston North: Dunmore Press. New Zealand Books 6 (2): 1-5

The Sociolinguistic Development of Canadian Raising in the English Fens. Essex Research Reports in Linguistics 5: 1-53.

1992

Linguistic Change in Intonation: the use of High Rising Terminals in New Zealand English. Language Variation and Change 4, 77-104.

High Rising Terminals in New Zealand English. Journal of the International Phonetic Association 22, 1-11 [with John Newman].

Research interests

Language variation and change, English dialectology (esp. of Southern England, East Anglia and the Anglophone Southern Hemisphere), sociophonology, dialect contact, new dialect formation and second dialect acquisition, language and dialect obsolescence, the emergent dialects of diaspora communities, and the interface between dialectology and human geography.

Editorial Responsibilities

Dave is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Sociolinguistics, and is on the editorial board of the Journal of Linguistic Geography, English World-Wide, the International Journal of English Studies, Babel, Atlantis: Journal of the Spanish Association of Anglo-American Studies, as well as the French Review of English Linguistics.

Projects

“Contact, mobility and authenticity: language ideologies in koineisation and creolisation”. August 2013 - July 2016. Swiss National Science Foundation - co-researchers Christoph Neuenschwander and Laura Tresch. This project examines how the process by which new language varieties, such as pidgins, creoles and koines, with roots in acts of mobility, become, in public and media discourses, legitimised and authenticised. The project is examining two creoles (Tok Pisin and Hawai'ian Creole English) and two koines (New Zealand English and Estuary English).

"English in paradise?: emergent varieties in Micronesia". January 2015 - December 2017. Swiss National Science Foundation - co-researchers Dominique Bürki and Tobias Leonhardt. This project investigates the emergent structures of and the similarities and differences between the new Englishes developing in three Micronesian territories: the Federated States of Micronesia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and Kiribati.

"Language contact in the Republic of Palau, Micronesia" - co-researcher Prof. Kazuko Matsumoto (University of Tokyo). In this project, we investigate the consequences of Palau's colonial contact with both Japanese and English, examining koineisation, borrowing and language obsolescence in the case of Palauan Japanese, and nativisation and the emergence of a new postcolonial variety in the case of Palauan English.

"The linguistic consequences of counterurbanisation". This project examines the consequences for East Anglian dialects of English of decades of demographic in-migration from London and the South-East of England. Examining both phonological and morphological variables, the project highlights not only the dramatic scale of traditional dialect levelling, but also, because levelling was found to be most extreme in the more rural areas of the region, questions existing models of linguistic innovation diffusion. This research has also enabled me to work with a large number of colleagues (including Prof. Peter Trudgill, Dr Laura Rupp, Dr Jenny Amos, Dr Sue Baker, Dr Wyn Johnson and Michelle Bray) on individual features of East Anglian English.

"Language variation and change in the Falkland Islands" (co-researcher Dr Andrea Sudbury). This research examines phonological and morpho-syntactic variation and change in the English of the Falkland Islands, and considers how this variety emerged, given its roots in the British settler dialects of the 19th century.

"Crowdsourcing dialect data: the English Dialect App" (co-researchers Dr. Adrian Leemann, Marie-Jose Kolly, Daniel Wanitsch, Sarah Grossenbacher, Melanie Calame). This research is developing an interactive app which engages users to think and learn about their own language variation, and collects dialect data from recordings and a questionnaire.

"Where North meets South: Dialect boundaries in the Fens". For over two decades now, I have been investigating the nature of the dialect transition zone that straddles the Fens in Eastern England. This is the site of a number of major dialect boundaries, including for features that are said to divide the linguistic 'north' and 'south' of England, such as the realisation of the STRUT and BATH vowels. I have been exploring not only the linguistic manifestations of the transition by considering a number of grammatical and phonological features, but also how the border originally emerged and why it remains to this day.